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The Education of American Workers - Education And Earnings

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Many people decide to attend college because they believe a college degree will help them get a better job and increase their earnings. In fact, individuals with a

TABLE 4.5 Labor force participation of persons 16 years old and over by highest level of education, age, sex, and race/ethnicity, 2004 "Table 376. Labor Force Participation of Persons 16 Years Old and Over, by Highest Level of Education, Age, Sex, and Race/Ethnicity: 2004," in Digest of Education Statistics, 2004, U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 2004, http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d04/tables/dt04_376.asp (accessed January 10, 2006)

TABLE 4.5
Labor force participation of persons 16 years old and over by highest level of education, age, sex, and race/ethnicity, 2004
Age, sex, and race/ethnicity Labor force participation ratea Employment/population ratiob
Total Less than high school completionc High school completion College Total Less than high school completionc High school completion College
Some college, no degree Associate's degree Bachelor's or higher degree Some college, no degree Associate's degree Bachelor's or higher degree
aPercent of the civilian population who are employed or seeking employment.
bNumber of persons employed as a percent of civilian population.
cIncludes persons reporting no school years completed.
dExcludes persons enrolled in school.
eReporting standards not met.
SOURCE: "Table 376. Labor Force Participation of Persons 16 Years Old and Over, by Highest Level of Education, Age, Sex, and Race/Ethnicity: 2004," in Digest of Education Statistics, 2004, U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 2004, http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d04/tables/dt04_376.asp (accessed January 10, 2006)
16 to 19 years oldd 43.9 36.0 64.0 55.6 e e 36.4 28.8 53.9 50.6 e e
Male 43.9 36.4 66.4 54.4 e e 35.9 28.6 55.5 48.9 e e
Female 43.8 35.6 61.7 56.6 e e 37.0 29.0 52.3 51.9 e e
White, non-Hispanic 49.1 41.4 67.7 58.6 e e 42.2 34.7 58.6 53.8 e e
Black, non-Hispanic 31.2 23.7 53.6 46.6 e e 21.2 14.5 38.6 39.1 e e
Hispanic 38.2 31.1 60.5 53.8 e e 30.4 23.6 50.0 48.1 e e
20 to 24 years oldd 75.0 67.6 78.9 70.7 82.4 83.3 67.9 56.5 70.1 65.4 77.6 78.6
Male 79.6 79.9 85.5 71.5 84.1 85.1 71.6 68.2 75.8 65.5 79.4 80.0
Female 70.5 51.3 70.8 70.0 81.2 82.0 64.3 41.0 63.3 65.3 76.2 77.7
White, non-Hispanic 77.8 67.5 82.0 72.7 84.8 85.6 71.9 56.9 74.4 68.1 80.8 81.4
Black, non-Hispanic 68.1 58.2 72.1 65.8 73.1 80.5 55.4 37.9 57.8 56.7 67.5 73.4
Hispanic 74.5 72.7 77.0 72.0 77.4 81.0 67.6 64.8 69.3 66.7 71.3 77.3
25 and older 66.9 45.1 63.2 70.3 76.6 77.9 64.0 41.2 60.0 67.1 73.8 75.8
Male 75.3 58.3 73.5 77.3 83.5 82.8 72.0 53.8 69.8 73.8 80.1 80.6
Female 59.3 32.5 54.1 64.3 71.5 72.8 56.7 29.2 51.5 61.3 69.1 70.9
White, non-Hispanic 66.1 35.8 60.9 68.6 76.2 77.3 63.7 33.1 58.3 66.1 73.7 75.3
Black, non-Hispanic 66.9 38.5 67.5 73.8 77.5 83.0 61.5 32.5 61.6 67.6 73.0 79.5
Hispanic 71.2 62.3 74.0 79.1 79.8 82.1 67.1 57.6 70.2 75.1 76.5 79.2

TABLE 4.6 Unemployment rate of persons 16 years old and over by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and educational attainment, 2002–04

TABLE 4.6
Unemployment rate of persons 16 years old and over by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and educational attainment, 2002–04
Sex, race/ethnicity, and educational attainment Percent unemployed, 2002a Percent unemployed, 2003a Percent unemployed, 2004a
16- to 24-year-oldsb 25 years old and over 16- to 24-year-oldsb 25 years old and over 16- to 24-year-oldsb 25 years old and over
Total 16 to 19 years 20 to 24 years Total 16 to 19 years 20 to 24 years Total 16 to 19 years 20 to 24 years
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
All persons
All education levels 12.0 16.5 9.7 4.6 12.4 17.4 10.0 4.8 11.9 17.0 9.4 4.4
     Less than high school completion 18.4 19.0 17.0 8.4 19.1 19.6 18.2 8.8 18.8 20.0 16.4 8.5
     High school completion, no college 12.6 15.9 11.1 5.3 13.4 17.4 12.0 5.5 12.4 15.8 11.1 5.0
     Some college, no degree 7.7 9.2 7.3 4.8 7.8 10.3 7.3 5.2 7.8 9.1 7.5 4.5
     Associate's degree 7.2 * 7.1 4.0 6.8 * 6.6 4.0 6.1 * 5.9 3.7
     Bachelor's or higher degree 5.8 * 5.8 2.9 6.1 * 6.1 3.1 5.6 * 5.6 2.7
Male
All education levels 12.8 18.1 10.2 4.7 13.4 19.3 10.6 5.0 12.6 18.4 10.1 4.4
     Less than high school completion 18.7 20.8 15.1 7.8 19.3 21.1 16.3 8.2 18.8 21.4 14.7 7.6
     High school completion, no college 12.7 16.4 11.3 5.4 14.0 19.6 12.1 5.7 12.7 16.4 11.4 5.1
     Some college, no degree 8.1 9.8 7.8 4.7 8.3 11.0 7.7 5.4 8.7 10.2 8.4 4.4
     Associate's degree 8.0 * 7.6 4.3 7.8 * 7.6 4.4 5.7 * 5.6 4.0
     Bachelor's or higher degree 6.9 * 7.0 3.0 6.7 * 6.8 3.2 5.9 * 5.9 2.7
Female
All education levels 11.1 14.9 9.1 4.6 11.4 15.6 9.3 4.6 11.0 15.5 8.7 4.4
     Less than high school completion 17.9 17.0 20.7 9.5 18.9 17.9 22.1 9.8 18.9 18.4 20.1 10.0
     High school completion, no college 12.3 15.4 10.9 5.1 12.7 15.1 11.7 5.2 12.1 15.2 10.6 4.9
     Some college, no degree 7.3 8.8 6.8 5.0 7.5 9.8 6.8 4.9 7.1 8.4 6.8 4.7
     Associate's degree 6.7 * 6.6 3.7 6.1 * 5.9 3.7 6.3 * 6.2 3.4
     Bachelor's or higher degree 5.1 * 5.0 2.8 5.5 * 5.6 2.9 5.3 * 5.3 2.7
White, non-Hispanic
All education levels 9.8 13.5 7.7 3.9 10.2 14.4 8.0 4.0 9.8 14.1 7.6 3.6
     Less than high school completion 15.6 15.4 16.4 7.5 16.7 16.4 18.1 7.6 16.2 16.3 15.7 7.7
     High school completion, no college 10.5 13.2 9.2 4.5 10.9 13.8 9.7 4.6 10.6 13.5 9.3 4.3
     Some college, no degree 6.3 8.0 5.8 4.2 6.7 8.9 6.2 4.3 6.7 8.2 6.4 3.7
     Associate's degree 6.0 * 5.6 3.5 5.1 * 4.8 3.5 4.9 * 4.8 3.3
     Bachelor's or higher degree 5.3 * 5.2 2.7 5.5 * 5.5 2.8 5.0 * 4.9 2.5
Black, non-Hispanic
All education levels 22.7 30.1 19.3 7.7 23.8 33.2 19.9 8.3 22.4 32.0 18.6 8.1
     Less than high school completion 35.0 34.9 35.2 13.6 36.8 35.9 38.2 13.9 37.1 38.7 34.9 15.5
     High school completion, no college 22.6 28.0 20.7 8.8 24.7 34.0 22.0 9.4 21.9 28.0 19.9 8.7
     Some college, no degree 14.6 15.7 14.4 6.9 14.6 21.1 13.5 8.6 14.2 16.2 13.9 8.4
     Associate's degree 13.3 * 13.6 6.0 13.6 * 12.8 6.1 6.9 * 7.2 5.9
     Bachelor's or higher degree 4.9 * 5.0 4.2 6.8 * 6.8 4.3 8.8 * 8.8 4.2

TABLE 4.6 Unemployment rate of persons 16 years old and over by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and educational attainment, 2002–04 (CONTINUED) "Table 378. Unemployment Rate of Persons 16 Years Old and Over, by Age, Sex, Race/Ethnicity, and Educational Attainment, 2002, 2003, and 2004," in Digest of Education Statistics, 2004, U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 2004, http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d04/tables/dt04_378.asp (accessed January 10, 2006)

TABLE 4.6
Unemployment rate of persons 16 years old and over by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and educational attainment, 2002–04 (CONTINUED)
Sex, race/ethnicity, and educational attainment Percent unemployed, 2002a Percent unemployed, 2003a Percent unemployed, 2004a
16- to 24-year-oldsb 25 years old and over 16- to 24-year-oldsb 25 years old and over 16- to 24-year-oldsb 25 years old and over
Total 16 to 19 years 20 to 24 years Total 16 to 19 years 20 to 24 years Total 16 to 19 years 20 to 24 years
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
*Reporting standards not met.
aThe unemployment rate is the percent of individuals in the labor force who are not working and who made specific efforts to find employment sometime during the prior 4 weeks. The labor force includes both employed and unemployed persons.
bExcludes persons enrolled in school.
cPersons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.
Note: Some data have been revised from previously published figures.
SOURCE: "Table 378. Unemployment Rate of Persons 16 Years Old and Over, by Age, Sex, Race/Ethnicity, and Educational Attainment, 2002, 2003, and 2004," in Digest of Education Statistics, 2004, U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 2004, http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d04/tables/dt04_378.asp (accessed January 10, 2006)
Hispanic originc
All education levels 12.9 20.0 9.9 6.1 12.8 20.0 10.2 6.4 12.3 20.4 9.3 5.7
     Less than high school completion 16.7 22.9 12.2 7.7 16.1 23.0 11.5 8.2 16.2 24.0 10.9 7.5
     High school completion, no college 11.4 17.3 9.5 5.9 12.4 18.3 10.8 5.9 11.6 17.2 10.0 5.2
     Some college, no degree 8.6 11.9 7.9 5.7 7.7 9.7 7.3 5.8 8.0 10.6 7.4 5.1
     Associate's degree 7.5 * 6.9 5.0 10.0 * 10.2 5.3 8.0 * 8.1 4.2
     Bachelor's or higher degree 8.4 * 8.5 3.4 11.1 * 11.1 4.1 5.0 * 5.0 3.5

TABLE 4.7 Labor force status of high school dropouts by sex and race/ethnicity, selected years, 1980–2004

TABLE 4.7
Labor force status of high school dropouts by sex and race/ethnicity, selected years, 1980–2004
Year, sex, and race or ethnicity Dropouts Dropouts in civilian labor forcea Dropouts not in labor force
Labor force Unemployed
Number (in thousands) Percent of total Number (in thousands) Participation rate Number (in thousands) Unemployment rate Number (in thousands) Percent of population
All dropoutsb
1980 739 100.0 471 63.7 149 31.6 268 36.3
1985 612 100.0 413 67.5 147 35.6 199 32.5
1990 405 100.0 280 69.0 90 32.3 125 31.0
1995 604 100.0 409 67.7 121 29.6 195 32.3
1996 496 100.0 289 58.4 80 27.6 206 41.6
1997 502 100.0 302 60.2 77 25.4 200 39.8
1998 505 100.0 308 60.9 87 28.2 197 39.1
1999 524 100.0 300 57.3 78 26.1 224 42.7
2000 515 100.0 350 68.0 99 28.1 165 32.0
2001 506 100.0 324 64.0 116 35.9 182 36.0
2002 401 100.0 271 67.7 81 29.8 129 32.3
2003 457 100.0 271 59.3 84 30.8 186 40.7
2004 496 100.0 267 53.7 106 39.9 229 46.3
Male
1980 422 57.1 305 72.3 93 30.5 117 27.7
1985 321 52.5 261 81.3 98 37.5 60 18.7
1990 215 53.1 173 80.2 63 36.2 42 19.8
1995 339 56.1 251 74.0 72 28.7 88 26.0
2000 295 57.3 220 74.4 54 24.5 76 25.6
2001 298 58.9 198 66.5 68 34.2 100 33.5
2002 214 53.4 149 69.5 35 23.4 65 30.5
2003 242 53.0 159 65.6 53 33.2 83 34.4
2004 278 56.0 166 59.9 67 40.4 112 40.1
Female
1980 317 42.9 166 52.4 56 33.7 151 47.6
1985 291 47.5 152 52.2 49 32.2 139 47.8
1990 190 46.9 107 56.3 28 26.1 83 43.7
1995 265 43.9 157 59.5 49 30.9 107 40.5
2000 220 42.7 131 59.4 45 34.2 90 40.6
2001 207 40.9 126 60.6 48 38.6 82 39.4
2002 187 46.6 122 65.6 46 37.6 64 34.4
2003 215 47.0 112 52.1 31 27.6 103 47.9
2004 218 44.0 100 45.9 39 38.9 118 54.1
Whitec
1980 580 78.5 392 67.6 106 27.0 188 32.4
1985 458 74.8 330 72.1 116 35.2 128 27.9
1990 303 74.8 211 69.8 56 26.3 92 30.2
1995 448 74.2 312 69.8 85 27.2 135 30.2
2000 384 74.6 280 73.0 70 24.9 104 27.0
2001 401 79.2 273 68.1 89 32.4 128 31.9
2002 281 70.1 188 67.0 48 25.6 93 33.0
2003 336 73.5 215 64.0 58 27.1 121 36.0
2004 370 74.6 196 53.0 56 28.8 174 47.0
Blackc
1980 146 19.8 73 50.0 40 e 73 50.0
1985 132 21.6 69 52.3 30 e 63 47.7
1990 86 21.2 56 65.3 30 e 30 34.7
1995 109 18.0 66 61.0 27 e 42 39.0
2000 111 21.5 58 51.9 27 e 53 48.1
2001 85 16.8 42 49.9 21 e 43 50.1
2002 79 19.7 55 69.8 27 e 24 30.2
2003 88 19.3 42 47.8 19 e 46 52.2
2004 91 18.3 50 54.4 39 e 42 45.6

higher level of education are generally more likely to be working, and they are likely to be earning more than those with lower levels of education. As reported by the U.S. Census Bureau in the Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2006, male college graduates who worked full-time, year-round in 2003 earned an average of $81,007, as compared with male high school graduates" average earnings of $38,331. (See Chapter 6 for complete discussion of earnings and benefits.)

The disparity in earnings increases with more advanced degrees, according to the BLS in Digest of Education Statistics, 2004. In 2002, the median annual income of a male without a high school diploma ($22,070) was only 36% of the median income of a master's degree holder TABLE 4.7 Labor force status of high school dropouts by sex and race/ethnicity, selected years, 1980–2004 (CONTINUED) "Table 381. Labor Force Status of High School Dropouts, by Sex and Race/Ethnicity: Selected Years, 1980 to 2004," in Digest of Education Statistics, 2004, U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 2004, http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d04/tables/dt04_381.asp (accesssed January 10, 2006)($61,439). The median income of a male with a high school diploma or equivalency certificate ($30,487) was about half as much as that of a master's degree holder. The proportion is similar for women: median annual income for a high school graduate was $20,254 in 2002, approximately 59% of the median income for a female bachelor's degree holder ($34,232) and 48% of the median income for a woman with a master's degree ($42,301). (See Table 4.8.)

TABLE 4.7
Labor force status of high school dropouts by sex and race/ethnicity, selected years, 1980–2004 (CONTINUED)
Year, sex, and race or ethnicity Dropouts Dropouts in civilian labor forcea Dropouts not in labor force
Labor force Unemployed
Number (in thousands) Percent of total Number (in thousands) Participation rate Number (in thousands) Unemployment rate Number (in thousands) Percent of population
aThe labor force includes all employed persons plus those seeking employment. The labor force participation rate is the percentage of persons either employed or seeking employment. The unemployment rate is the percent of persons in the labor force who are seeking employment.
bPersons 16 to 24 years old who dropped out of school in the 12-month period ending in October of years shown.
cIncludes persons of Hispanic origin.
dPersons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.
eReporting standards not met.
Note: Data are based upon sample surveys of the civilian noninstitutional population. Includes dropouts from any grade, including a small number from elementary and middle schools. Detail for the above race and Hispanic-origin groups will not sum to totals because data for the "other races" group are not presented and Hispanics are included in both the white and black population groups. Some data have been revised from previously published figures. Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding.
SOURCE: "Table 381. Labor Force Status of High School Dropouts, by Sex and Race/Ethnicity: Selected Years, 1980 to 2004," in Digest of Education Statistics, 2004, U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 2004, http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d04/tables/dt04_381.asp (accesssed January 10, 2006)
Hispanicd
1980 91 12.3 60 65.9 17 e 31 34.1
1985 106 17.3 73 68.9 33 e 33 31.1
1990 67 16.5 32 e 10 e 35 e
1995 174 28.8 119 68.6 35 29.3 55 31.4
2000 101 19.6 62 61.1 22 e 39 38.9
2001 119 23.5 84 70.6 27 32.6 35 29.4
2002 94 23.4 62 66.5 23 e 31 33.5
2003 124 27.1 68 54.5 17 e 57 45.5
2004 154 31.0 87 56.8 27 30.7 67 43.2

There is a long-term difference between the earnings of males and females with the same educational background. Among full-time, year-round workers, males tend to earn more than females across all levels of education. The differential was most pronounced at the professional degree level (medical doctor, law school graduate). In 2002, of men and women twenty-five years of age or older who had attained a doctor's degree, 35.9% of men earned $100,000 or more, as compared with 18.5% of women. (See Table 4.8.)

Beyond the Bachelor's Degree

Having a bachelor's degree opens the door to many occupational options, but a degree itself does not guarantee that a graduate will enter a high-paying career. In general, graduates who major in business, computer sciences, and engineering will find that occupations in their subject areas pay higher salaries than do those in education, the humanities, and social and behavioral sciences. For example, according to the BLS in the Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2006–07, median annual earnings of network systems and data communication analysts ($60,600) and administrative services managers ($60,290) were considerably higher than those for K-12 teachers (between $41,400 and $45,920), salaried writers ($44,350), or social workers $40,080 in May 2004. The starting salaries for engineers graduating with a bachelor's degree in May 2004 surpassed the median annual earnings of many other professions. Among the highest starting salaries that year were petroleum engineering ($61,516), chemical engineering ($53,813), and computer engineering ($52,464).

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The lifelong earnings potential of a college degree makes a four-year bachelor's degree attractive to both recent high school graduates and adults returning to formal education to advance their careers. In some fast-growing occupational fields, including health care and education, the highest-paying jobs now require formal education beyond the bachelor's degree for entry or advancement. Figure 4.1 presents a list of twenty large-growth occupations that require a master's, doctoral, or first-professional degree for employment, and the projected change in employment in these occupations from 2004 through 2014.

Twelve of these occupations, including physicians and surgeons, pharmacists, physical therapists, medical researchers, and chiropractors, are projected to be among the highest-paying jobs in the burgeoning field of health care through 2014. Other occupations on the list, including postsecondary (college level) teachers, TABLE 4.8 Distribution of money income and median income of persons 25 years old and over, by educational attainment and sex, 2002school counselors, and school psychologists, are in the fast-growing occupational category of educational services. These education occupations also represent career advancement and salary enhancement opportunities for individuals who enter the field of teaching with a bachelor's degree.

TABLE 4.8
Distribution of money income and median income of persons 25 years old and over, by educational attainment and sex, 2002
Sex and income Total Less than 9th grade Some high school (no completion) High school completion (includes equivalency) College
Some college, no degree Associate's degree Bachelor's or higher degree
Total Bachelor's degree Master's degree Professional degree Doctor's degree
Males and females, 25 years old and over 2 (in thousands)
    Total 185,183 12,276 16,323 59,292 31,762 15,147 50,382 33,213 12,157 2,803 2,209
With income 128,155 4,702 8,475 39,015 23,499 11,934 40,530 26,497 9,903 2,297 1,833
Percentage distribution of males and with income
Total annual income 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
    $1 to $4,999 or less 6.6 11.0 10.1 7.6 6.9 5.7 4.3 4.8 3.7 2.7 3.0
    $5,000 to $9,999 6.3 13.3 11.7 7.6 6.2 5.2 3.4 3.9 2.7 1.8 1.3
    $10,000 to $14,999 8.3 20.1 15.4 10.1 7.9 6.7 4.3 4.8 3.8 1.9 3.5
    $15,000 to $19,999 8.8 18.7 15.1 11.8 8.4 8.0 4.0 4.5 3.5 2.6 2.1
    $20,000 to $24,999 9.7 14.6 13.9 12.6 10.4 10.0 4.9 5.8 3.6 2.5 2.2
    $25,000 to $29,999 8.9 7.2 10.4 11.3 10.3 10.2 5.3 6.5 3.5 1.6 2.1
    $30,000 to $34,999 8.8 5.3 7.3 10.2 9.4 10.3 7.6 8.6 6.5 4.2 3.3
    $35,000 to $39,999 7.1 3.2 5.1 6.6 8.3 8.5 7.3 7.9 6.9 4.4 5.1
    $40,000 to $49,999 10.8 3.3 5.4 9.4 11.7 13.7 12.9 13.2 14.0 8.5 8.3
    $50,000 to $74,999 14.2 2.4 4.0 9.5 13.8 15.6 22.1 20.9 26.4 17.4 21.1
    $75,000 to $99,999 5.1 0.5 1.0 2.0 3.9 3.9 10.6 9.4 12.1 13.5 17.1
    $100,000 or more 5.4 0.5 0.6 1.4 2.7 2.0 13.2 9.7 13.3 38.9 30.7
Median income $30,553 $16,322 $19,095 $25,081 $29,903 $31,358 $46,026 $41,361 $50,704 $76,659 $71,541
Males, 25 years old and over (in thousands)
    Total 88,597 6,049 8,026 27,356 15,175 6,394 25,598 16,351 5,882 1,837 1,528
With income 68,153 3,074 5,159 20,558 12,188 5,405 21,770 14,012 4,943 1,527 1,287
Percentage distribution of males with income
Total annual income 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
    $1 to $4,999 or less 4.3 7.5 7.0 4.9 4.5 3.7 2.5 2.6 2.1 2.2 3.0
    $5,000 to $9,999 4.2 10.0 8.3 5.1 3.8 3.4 2.1 2.3 2.0 1.8 1.3
    $10,000 to $14,999 6.1 17.5 12.1 6.9 5.7 4.4 3.0 3.3 2.5 1.2 3.1
    $15,000 to $19,999 7.4 19.8 14.3 9.5 6.0 4.8 3.3 3.7 3.1 1.9 1.3
    $20,000 to $24,999 8.3 16.3 14.4 10.9 7.6 7.7 3.8 4.4 3.2 2.1 2.2
    $25,000 to $29,999 8.0 8.6 12.0 11.0 8.7 8.3 3.8 4.6 2.8 0.9 1.5
    $30,000 to $34,999 8.8 6.6 9.7 11.3 9.5 9.0 6.1 7.2 4.6 2.4 3.5
    $35,000 to $39,999 7.4 4.2 6.7 8.4 9.2 8.5 5.8 6.6 4.7 3.1 3.9
    $40,000 to $49,999 11.9 4.4 7.2 12.1 14.6 17.0 11.0 12.2 10.2 6.0 7.4
    $50,000 to $74,999 18.0 3.4 5.8 14.5 19.7 22.6 24.1 24.7 26.8 14.6 18.5
    $75,000 to $99,999 7.3 0.7 1.5 3.2 6.3 6.8 14.3 13.2 16.5 13.5 18.3
    $100,000 or more 8.3 0.7 1.0 2.2 4.4 3.7 20.2 15.1 21.4 50.2 35.9
Median income $36,384 $18,632 $22,070 $30,487 $36,659 $40,056 $56,745 $51,351 $61,439 $100,000 $77,444
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